Has Got Better Or Has Gotten Better?

Can you use more better in a sentence?

Yes, “more better” is a grammar mistake.

English adjectives can take on different forms: regular, comparative, or superlative.

When we use the comparative form (“more” before an adjective or “er” appended to the end of an adjective), we can only use “more” or the word ending in “er,” but not both..

Can you use gotten in a sentence?

Here are a few examples of how an American speaker would use gotten in a sentence: I’ve gotten better at singing since I started taking lessons. Movie tickets have gotten so expensive! Once you’ve gotten the computer working, would you try to fix the TV?

What is the meaning of getting worse?

to get worse: to deteriorate in quality or condition, to become more serious. to worsen is a synonym of the expression to get worse. Her illness is getting worse: she can’t live alone any more. to get worse and worse to become continually worse.

Should ve got or gotten?

If you speak British English, just use “got” and avoid “gotten” altogether. … In American English, the past participle of “get” in its literal sense of “receive” or “become” is usually “gotten”. In the sense of “must” or “have”, the past participle is always “got”.

Where we use have had?

Had had is the past perfect form of have when it is used as a main verb to describe our experiences and actions. We use the past perfect when we are talking about the past and want to refer back to an earlier past time, Madiini.

Is gotten in the English dictionary?

Gotten is the past participle of get1 in American English.

Can you say more clever?

“Cleverer” is correct. In degrees of comparison, we need to see the syllable of the word. For monosyllabic and disyllabic words, there is no need to add more and most. … So the positive- comparative-superlative degrees for “clever” is clever- cleverer-cleverest.

Is it correct to say gotten?

“Had gotten” is correctly used in American English when referring to the past (participle) process of obtaining something. When implying ownership—or in British English—”had got” is the correct form. The Oxford Dictionary article explains this well: gotten – definition of gotten in English | Oxford Dictionaries.

What is another word for gotten?

What is another word for gotten?discoveredfoundcome to knowcame to knowtwiggedrumbledespiedgotten wise tocaughtfathomed out146 more rows

What is mean by worst?

The adjective worst describes the thing that is the least good, like this awful pizza, the worst we’ve ever had in our lives. Worst means “the least favorable outcome.” You may have heard the saying “hope for the best but expect the worst.” Well, it you get the worst, you know there is nothing more bad than that.

Is worse or a word?

The correct word is worse. Worse is the comparative degree of adjective of the word BAD.

Is thunk a proper word?

A: Yes, the verb form “thunk” is a word, but it’s not a new one. The real question is whether it’s a legitimate word or not. The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (4th ed.) describes it as a “nonstandard” past tense and past participle of the verb “think.”

Is most easy correct?

Both are definitely wrong. “More easy” is wrong because it is a comparative of 2 syllables ending in “Y”, but “most easier” is a mixture of comparative and superlative,which simply doesn’t exist.

Has got or has gotten?

In general, “have got” is the present perfect form of “to get” in UK English, while “have gotten” is the US English version. However, even in US English, “have got” is used in certain instances, namely to mean present tense have (in the sense of possession, or to mean must):

Is much more better grammatically correct?

You were correct to say “much more better” is not correct. It is simply “much better.” I hope you feel much more gooder now that you have assurance from natives?

Is gotten formal?

One noteworthy word is gotten: standard in the US but not in the UK. In both countries, the past tense of get is got. … Roughly: when talking about a static situation (possessing or needing) the past participle is got; when talking about a dynamic situation (acquiring or becoming) the past participle is gotten.

Is haven’t gotten proper English?

If you want to say about you not getting sleep or if you haven’t slept. Also remember that: gotten is the standard past participle for American English. While got is the past participle used commonly in British English.

How do you say something is getting worse?

Synonymsworsen. verb. to become worse, or to make something worse.decline. verb. to become less or worse.deteriorate. verb. to become worse.deepen. verb. if a bad situation deepens, it becomes worse.escalate. verb. to become much worse or more serious, or to make something do this.degenerate. verb. to become worse.spiral. verb. … slide. verb.More items…

Is gotten informal?

Get is the present tense form of the verb. In informal contexts, many speakers use have got, ‘ve got, or simply got to mean “have” or “must.” You should avoid this usage of the verb get in your writing; instead, use have or must. …

What is worse got or gotten worse?

Got is English “gotten”, which is worse, is US. Americans say gotten as did the British some centuries ago. British mainly say ‘has got’, though do say ill-gotten gains.